Once Upon an Autumn Evening...


My name is Jimmy Sue. I'm an animation student from the San Francisco Bay Area. I am 20, gender fluid (they/them or alternating she/her and he/him preferred, but not necessarily enforced), Pin@y, Scorpio, and ENFP. Extremely pro-choice, moderately pro-guns. Social rights activist.

I believe in equality through the dismantlement of rape culture, forced binary gender roles or toxic masculinity/femininity, hetero/monosexual-normativity, ableism, and racial inequality still deeply ingrained in modern society. We as a society are shackled by this cluster of systems which invisibly control us. We as a society must break free of this in order for all to reap the benefits of a truly equal world. No one will truly lose. You who are privileged within these systems, who gain some advantage as the systems stand, are in some ways afraid, whether you admit it or not, and while I understand where your fear comes from, I am not here to cater to it. Understand my words come from a place of survival, of centuries of oppression people like me have faced and the remnants that stay subtly intact in the infrastructure of our society. I do not stand for the blind hatred of the privileged, but I do not stand for actions which perpetuate the oppressive system. I am not afraid to speak out against what I find problematic. My logic may be flawed. I am only human. We are all entitled to our own opinions. I identify as a feminist. I invite any and all MRAs to join me in the dismantlement of toxic masculinity and of forced gender roles and stereotype, and the empowerment of men of color, queer men, and male victims of sexual assault and abuse. I've been asked to say I am egalitarian by some, however I shall not back down to the asinine demands of folk obsessed solely with semantics. While I do believe diction matters, there are much more important things to be done here, and I respectfully refuse to bog myself down with such trivial matters when it comes to the differences between an intersectional feminist and an egalitarian. Down with TERFs. Down with the patriarchy. Down with the socially enforced gender binary. I will post mostly cute and funny things I find, things I find important to my causes, occasional art, and such.

Find me on Instagram, and Fur Affinity, username: theleafylemur



Questions?

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floozys:

floozys:

my feminist goal is not to convince men that girls are of value, my feminist goal is to achieve a future where the judgement of our value isn’t in the hands of men. 

and this goes for, especially goes for, trans girls, girls of colour, disabled girls and LGBTQA+ girls. 

girls, all girls, and if you believe otherwise don’t reblog this.   

Source: floozys

Source: attrip.jp

star-anise:

So some dudes were complaining lately, “Women are telling guys to stop telling them how to dress, but not all guys are total misogynists!  Women do it to each other too!”
So. People.  Let me tell you a thing.
This is a picture of a panopticon. It’s a kind of prison.  See, it’s a giant circle, with all the cells around the rim.  The tower in the middle is where the guards are.  The guards can see into all the prisoners’ cells, but the prisoners cannot see each other, and they have difficulty seeing the guards.  Each prisoner knows that at any time, they are being watched, and if the guards see them behaving incorrectly, they will come with truncheons and beat the prisoner up.  They learn to feel that gaze on them, all the time; every movement makes them think, “What if this breaks the rules, and they see, and they come and punish me?”  Soon, prisoners don’t need guards standing over them all the time to follow the rules; they do it themselves, because that gaze is omnipresent.  Even when the guard house is empty, they still think, “What if someone is watching me?”  (This is all from Michel Foucault.  You want more on this, go read Discipline and Punish, enjoy the descriptions of medieval torture.)
The panopticon is a metaphor.  In our society, we are constantly watched, tracked, disciplined, and punished, from childhood. The school says you skipped class today.  The babysitter says you wouldn’t follow the rules.  The police saw you at the park with your friends.  We are held to valid rules, and to bullshit rules; some of them are necessary to make our society safe, and some of them just make us easier to exploit.
You are held to rules.  I am held to rules.  They vary.  As a woman, I am held to rules that say be small be pretty defer to someone else and I’m punished in different ways if I don’t obey.  My brother is held to different rules, that say be strong don’t feel dominate the situation.  We end up policing each other; we meet and he says, “Looking good,” and I remember: people are watching how I dress and how I look.  If I disobey, they will notice, and I could be punished.  I meet him after his job and ask, “Do you think you’ll be promoted soon?” and he remembers: people pay attention to whether or not I’m in charge, and if I’m not dominant, I could be punished.
Sometimes the guardhouse is empty.  Sometimes nobody is paying close attention to what I’m wearing.  Sometimes the guards don’t come to punish me, so whether or not I am pretty or attractive does not affect whether I get to own property.  (It used to: whether or not my ancestresses were married affected their legal and economic statuses hugely)
Feminism is about the work of dismantling the prison when it comes to bullshit rules.  It’s about saying that we shouldn’t be held to stupid rules based on gender.  So it’s about the work of getting rid of the cells and the watchtower, and getting rid of the guards with truncheons.  We can stop telling each other these stories about all the rules we’re held to, and we can stop punishing each other for breaking them.  My brother stops telling me, “You’ll never get a date if you dress like that.”  I stop telling him, “You need to be strong and work hard so you come out on top.”
So no, feminists don’t believe that all men everywhere are 100% misogynistic.  It’s just that a lot of women are conditioned to think that 100% of the time, there is a risk that someone is watching us, and we will be punished if the break the rules.  It is really hard work to break the social structures and the internal attitudes that imprison us.
And yes, women can enforce the panopticon.  Hell, I’ll even tell you a womanly secret: I cannot count the number of times I’ve received cruelty at the hands of fellow girls for the way I looked or dressed.  My entire middle school experience was basically that and algebra. We’re working on fixing that!  Please, do not doubt that we’ve been working on that among ourselves as a gender.  Women have spent a lot of blood, sweat, and tears trying to change how we treat each other.  Now we’re asking you to pitch in.

star-anise:

So some dudes were complaining lately, “Women are telling guys to stop telling them how to dress, but not all guys are total misogynists!  Women do it to each other too!”

So. People.  Let me tell you a thing.

This is a picture of a panopticon. It’s a kind of prison.  See, it’s a giant circle, with all the cells around the rim.  The tower in the middle is where the guards are.  The guards can see into all the prisoners’ cells, but the prisoners cannot see each other, and they have difficulty seeing the guards.  Each prisoner knows that at any time, they are being watched, and if the guards see them behaving incorrectly, they will come with truncheons and beat the prisoner up.  They learn to feel that gaze on them, all the time; every movement makes them think, “What if this breaks the rules, and they see, and they come and punish me?”  Soon, prisoners don’t need guards standing over them all the time to follow the rules; they do it themselves, because that gaze is omnipresent.  Even when the guard house is empty, they still think, “What if someone is watching me?”  (This is all from Michel Foucault.  You want more on this, go read Discipline and Punish, enjoy the descriptions of medieval torture.)

The panopticon is a metaphor.  In our society, we are constantly watched, tracked, disciplined, and punished, from childhood. The school says you skipped class today.  The babysitter says you wouldn’t follow the rules.  The police saw you at the park with your friends.  We are held to valid rules, and to bullshit rules; some of them are necessary to make our society safe, and some of them just make us easier to exploit.

You are held to rules.  I am held to rules.  They vary.  As a woman, I am held to rules that say be small be pretty defer to someone else and I’m punished in different ways if I don’t obey.  My brother is held to different rules, that say be strong don’t feel dominate the situation.  We end up policing each other; we meet and he says, “Looking good,” and I remember: people are watching how I dress and how I look.  If I disobey, they will notice, and I could be punished.  I meet him after his job and ask, “Do you think you’ll be promoted soon?” and he remembers: people pay attention to whether or not I’m in charge, and if I’m not dominant, I could be punished.

Sometimes the guardhouse is empty.  Sometimes nobody is paying close attention to what I’m wearing.  Sometimes the guards don’t come to punish me, so whether or not I am pretty or attractive does not affect whether I get to own property.  (It used to: whether or not my ancestresses were married affected their legal and economic statuses hugely)

Feminism is about the work of dismantling the prison when it comes to bullshit rules.  It’s about saying that we shouldn’t be held to stupid rules based on gender.  So it’s about the work of getting rid of the cells and the watchtower, and getting rid of the guards with truncheons.  We can stop telling each other these stories about all the rules we’re held to, and we can stop punishing each other for breaking them.  My brother stops telling me, “You’ll never get a date if you dress like that.”  I stop telling him, “You need to be strong and work hard so you come out on top.”

So no, feminists don’t believe that all men everywhere are 100% misogynistic.  It’s just that a lot of women are conditioned to think that 100% of the time, there is a risk that someone is watching us, and we will be punished if the break the rules.  It is really hard work to break the social structures and the internal attitudes that imprison us.

And yes, women can enforce the panopticon.  Hell, I’ll even tell you a womanly secret: I cannot count the number of times I’ve received cruelty at the hands of fellow girls for the way I looked or dressed.  My entire middle school experience was basically that and algebra. We’re working on fixing that!  Please, do not doubt that we’ve been working on that among ourselves as a gender.  Women have spent a lot of blood, sweat, and tears trying to change how we treat each other.  Now we’re asking you to pitch in.

Source: star-anise

lotolle:

typette:

doujinsushi:

when I was younger I used to watch Winnie the Pooh all the time and everytime I saw pooh eating honey I was always like “mmmm that looks good” so imagine my disappointment when I saw honey for the first time. Pooh is eating like nacho cheese lookin honey he had me excited for nothing

no, bro. Pooh is eating raw, unpasteurized honey. Like this:

image

godlike

Oh my God. I’ve literally thought this my entire life. 

Source: doujinsushi

dmolech:

I did a thing for a contest and I think it turned out pretty durn cute

dmolech:

I did a thing for a contest and I think it turned out pretty durn cute

Source: dmolech

So I totally accidentally posted an NSFW drawing here, which is now no longer on this blog, but if anyone’s interested I started a blog where I’ll be posting my naughty drawings and writings, as well as reblogging… “Reference”… Yeah, we’re going with that. If anyone’s interested, this new blog is “the-yiffing-lemur”

dekutrickortreet:

telapathetic:

when u haven’t masturbated in ages and

image

damn imma stop masturbating for a while so i can grow cannons on my back and launch torrents of water at people

Source: telapathetic

merelei:

aliens-ate-my-mum:

Showing my favourite movie to my friends
image

This gif is so appropriate in so many ways I love it so much!

Source: aliens-ate-my-mum

  • Person: *reblogs my post*
  • Me: oh thank god they still follow me

Source: pocketloueh

Brain teasers for egalitarians/equalists. →

ikaricrossinglines:

stfufauxminists:

alexandraerin:

Say I’m 32 years old and you’re 22 years old.

In how many years will we be the same age?

Silly question, right? If you define aging as a process that stops at death, the only way we’ll ever be the same age is if I die…

Tagged: important

Source: blue-author